In January, 2020, I was thrilled to begin the internship program at the Blinken Open Society Archives. I had just been accepted into the Budapest Semester Program at George Mason University, and I was thrilled at the prospect of exploring a new city, and learning from faculty at Central European University and the Archives.
“Sarajevo, the biggest concentration camp in the world,” wrote Arma Tanović at the age of 15. Arma was one of the Sarajevan kids and teenagers, who, a year into the siege, sent letters to their American pen pals, in which they introduced themselves and their daily challenges hardly imaginable for others, and asked their unknown friends to do everything they could to stop the war.
Providing insight into the publishing and academic activities of Hungarian emigré circles in the US, the Peter Pastor Collection was donated to Blinken OSA in 2018 by Peter Pastor, a professor emeritus of history at Montclair State University, New Jersey. After being processed and cataloged, the collection is now ready for research (and will be physically available once the Archives can reopen after the outbreak is over).
As the exhibition Faith – Trust – Secrecy is temporarily closed due to the coronavirus outbreak, the OSA blog will present segments of the show with links to the Hidden Galleries Digital Archive, where the featured stories and themes can be explored in more detail.  More on the exhibition from the OSA blog:
March 25 is the birthday of Béla Bartók. We honor the memory of Bartók with a lecture by József Mélyi, a 1931 letter the composer wrote to Octavian Beu, and a 1988 radio report on the preparations for the return of Bartók's ashes to Hungary.
As the exhibition Faith – Trust – Secrecy is temporarily closed due to the coronavirus outbreak, the OSA blog will present segments of the show with links to the Hidden Galleries Digital Archive, where the featured stories and themes can be explored in more detail. 
“The situation is between peacetime democracy and war,” said the Prime Minister of Hungary, as the government introduced state of emergency in the country.
As a consequence of the coronavirus outbreak, public March 15 commemorations had to be cancelled in 2020. Whoever wanted to celebrate this day, they had to do so at home.
"(...) in order to see perfect disciplines functioning, rulers dreamt of the state of plague." To comprehend the meaning and the gravity of the Hungarian government's decision of declaring a state of emergency, one should revisit Michel Foucault's Discipline and Punish. The full text is available online, here we share a segment from the chapter Panopticism (pp195–200.)
The Archives received posters produced by Atelier Populaire, a workshop that supported the 1968 Paris protests with graphic works. “He threw shit at the fan!” Or literally: "He is the bed shitter." One of the best-known posters retorts Charles de Gaulle’s criticism of students.