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BOX-FOLDER-REPORT: 87-8-3
TITLE:             League of Communists of Yugoslavia (LCY)
BY:                Slobodan Stankovic
DATE:              1986-11-14
COUNTRY:           Yugoslavia
ORIGINAL SUBJECT:  

--- Begin ---

14 November 1986 Yugoslavia
YUGOSLAVIA

LEAGUE OF COMMUNISTS OF YUGOSLAVIA (LCY)

CENTRAL COMMITTEE PRESIDIUM
President: Milenko RENOVICA
Members: Ivan BRIGIC
Dusan CKREBIC
Radisa GACIC
Stefan KOROSEC
Bosko KRUNIC
Marko ORLANDIC
Milan PANCEVSKI
Ivica RACAN
Franc SETINC
Kol SHIROKA
Stipe SUVAR
Vasile TUPURKOVSKI
Vidoje ZARKOVIC

Ex Officio Members*: General Georgije JOVICIC
Milan KUCAN
Jakov LAZAROSKI
Slobodan MILOSEVIC
Miljan RADOVIC
Stanko STOJCEVIC
Djordje STOJCIC
Milan UZELAC
Azem VLLASI

SECRETARY OF THE CC PRESIDIUM: Radisa GACIC

STATE

PRESIDENCY OF THE SFRY
President: Sinan HASANI**
(Kosovo)

Vice-President: Lazar MOJSOV
(Macedonia)

* Presidents of the Republican Central Committees, Provincial Committees, and
the Army Party Committee, elected for a one-year term.

** Term of office expires on 15 May 1987

[page 2]

Yugoslavia 14 November 1986
 
Other Members: Hamdija POZDERAC
(Bosnia-Herzegovina)
Stane DOLANC
(Slovenia)
General Nikola LJUBICIC
(Serbia)
Josip VRHOVEC
(Croatia)
Veselin DJURANOVIC
(Montengro)
Radovan VLAJKOVIC
(Vojvodina)
Milenko RENOVICA*
(LCY CC Presidium)
Secretary-General**: Muhamed BERBEROVIC
ASSEMBLY OF THE SFRY***
President: Ivo VRANDECIC 
(Croatia)
Vice-President: Nedjo BOSKOVIC
(Serb-Kosovo)
President, Federal Chamber: Mileva-Takeva
GLIGORIJEVIC
(Macedonia)
Vice-President: Vilmos MOLNAR
(Hungarian-
Vojvodina)
President, Chamber of Republics
and Provinces: Milenko BOJANIC
(Serbia)
Vice-President: Niko FILIPOVIC 
(Croat, Bosnia-
Herzegovina )
GOVERNMENT
FEDERAL EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
President (Prime Minister): Branko MIKULIC

* The President of the CC Presidium is always ex officio the ninth member
of the State Presidency.

** A purely administrative position and not actually a member of the State
Presidency.

*** Elected for a one-year term.

[page 3]

14 November 1986 Yugoslavia

Vice-Presidents (Deputy Prime
Ministers) Milos MILOSAVLJEVIC
Janez ZEMLJARIC
Members:
(Ministers Without Portfolio) Dragi DANEV
Francska HERGA
Oskar KOVAC
Radoje KONTIC
Radovan MAKIC
Mustafa MUHAMED
Nevenka
NERALIC-MILIVOJEVIC
Egon PADOVAN
Mito PEJOVSKI
Tibor SALMA
Ibrahim TABAKOVIC
Momcilo VUCINIC
Federal Secretaries (Ministers):
Agriculture Sava VUJKOV
Economy Aleksandar DONEV
Finance Svetozar RIKANOVIC
Foreign Affairs Raif DIZDAREVIC
Foreign Trade Nenad KREKIC
Industry and Energy Andrej OCVIRK
Information Svetozar DURUTOVIC
Internal Affairs Dobroslav CULAFIC
Justice and Public Administration Petar VAJOVIC
Labor and Social Policies Janko OBOCKI
Legislation Lojze UDE
National Defense Admiral Branko MAMULA
Science Bozidar MATIC
Tourism Miodrag MIROVIC
Transportation Mustafa PLJAKIC
Veterans' Affairs Ilija VAKIC

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[page 4]

RAD BR/139

YUGOSLAVIA

Last February a top Yugoslav party leader and former member
of the Yugoslav government in charge of religious affairs,
Radovan Samardzic, admitted that "the weakening of party unity
promoted the strengthening of the Churches and the political
homogeneity of individual religious communities with regard to
our social system."[1]

How strong, in fact, are religious feelings in Yugoslavia?
The communist leaders were disturbed by a recent poll by Nikola
Dugandzija that revealed that in the Zagreb area alone "43.1% of
those questioned said they were sending their children for
religious instruction or would send them if they had children."
Moreover, 40.3% said they would "welcome the introduction of
religious instruction in the schools." Only one question was
asked: "Do you agree with the views and actions of religious
organizations advocating their own participation in the school
system?"[2] In a comment on this study, Borba said:

From various indications one can conclude that in practice
an even larger number of children were receiving
[religious] instruction than [previously] believed. It is a
fact, Dugandzija said, that almost every student in certain
school classes took part in religious instruction.
Therefore, the problem was no longer how to take part in
religious instruction but rather (with such a large
majority participating) how to avoid it. Consequently, the
researcher said, since parents were sending their children
for religious instruction in such large numbers, it was
understandable that they, the parents, had been supporting
the religious organizations in their demand to become a
part of the educational system.[3]

A Monk Arrested for Giving Communion to Sick Man at Home.
Sava Nedeljkovic, the Superior of the Liplje Serbian Orthodox
Monastery in Bosnia, was imprisoned for 20 days last July
because in March 1985 he had "carried out the ceremonies of
confession and Communion" for a sick man in his home "without
the permission of the responsible communal authorities."
Nedeljkovic appealed to several higher courts but all of them,
including the Supreme Court of the Socialist Republic of
Bosnia-Herzegovina, rejected his appeal; and he was detained for
20 days.[4]

Moslem Believers. The religious situation among the
Moslems in Yugoslavia seems to be even more acute. The
authorities complain that Bosnia has become "a bastion of Islam"
and that young people especially have become fanatical in
preaching Islam.5 Communist leaders in the Montenegrin town of
Ivangrad complained that "the Marxist school closed down, while
religious instruction [for the Moslems] works better than ever."
The director of a village school said:

[page 5]

RAD BR/139

Ideology has been taken over by the imam, while we 300
party members watch all this with folded arms .... We
Communists have to tell our imam: Stop this! I do not
interfere with how the dead should be buried--this is
usually decided by the family--but I insist that wreaths
must be carried in front. Our imam does not permit this.
He also banned drinking brandy or smoking cigarettes after
funerals![6]

Pilgrimages to Medjugorje Criticized. Almost daily there
are articles in Yugoslav newspapers criticizing the pilgrimages
to the Herzegovinian village of Medjugorje, where the Virgin
Mary is claimed to have appeared. A Zagreb daily recently
complained that several hundred thousand pilgrims, from
Yugoslavia and abroad but mostly from Italy, had visited
Medjugorje. The paper also complained that the Yugoslav
authorities, instead of benefiting from these mass visits by
organizing tourist facilities, had left private entrepreneurs to
make Medjugorje into "a gold mine" earning huge sums of foreign
currency.[7]

A Belgrade tabloid recently attacked "the political
underground" in the Serbian Orthodox Church, which was mainly
composed of "young intellectual monks." One of them, the Serbian
Orthodox Metropolitan of Zagreb and Ljubljana, Bishop Jovan,
asked the Patriarch to ban the proregime priests' association.
The Patriarch, however, rejected the demand.8 Radovan Samardzic,
who was mentioned above, quoted another Serbian Bishop as having
said, "Certainly, I am in favor of socialism; but I am not sure
whether socialism would accept me!" Samardzic complained:

The nationalists, the opponents of our system, have been
looking for shelter in the Catholic and Serbian Orthodox
Churches and in the Islamic Community. These people have
taken over the leadership of various religious communities
and work against socialism.[9] 

For this reason an amendment to the law has been proposed
providing for fines between 2,000 and 20,000 dinars (about $5 to
$50) or 30 days imprisonment to be imposed on any person
performing a religious ceremony outside those places permitted
by the law. Also, anyone spreading his religious feelings by
means of radio or film would be liable to a fine of between
10,000 and 100,000 dinars (about $25 to $250).[10] The Yugoslav
media do not conceal the fact that persecution of the Churches
meets with "embittered opposition" from the people.[11]

Slobodan Stankovic

* * *

[page 6]

RAD BR/139

1 Nedeljna Dalmacija (Split), 9 February 1986.

2 Borba (Belgrade), 19 August 1986.

3 Ibid.

4 Clas Koncila (Zagreb), 17 August 1986.

5 Reuter, 19 August 1986.

6 Politika (Belgrade), 19 August 1986.

7 Vjesnik (Zagreb), 24 August 1986.

8 8 Novosti (Belgrade), 31 July 1986.

9 Nedeljna Dalmacija, 9 February 1986.

10 Danas (Zagreb), 1 April 1986.

11 NIN, 3 August 1986.

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